Teacher-created Video Series: 3 Great Ideas for Screencasting Software

A little over a year ago, a few different spheres in the education orbit collided right in front of me, and I have been reaping the benefits since. I had the good fortune to hear Jon Bergmann speak at ISTE 2016 (I talk about this a little bit in my ISTE 2016 post here), initiating my research into the flipped classroom. At around the same time, I discovered Catlin Tucker’s blog. Tucker is an ELA teacher and Blended Learning extraordinaire. I found a lot of crossover between these two leaders’ voices, with both clearly outlining the WHYs and the HOWs behind their respective educational philosophies.

More notably, I’ve been using the station rotation model of blended learning, something that Tucker writes about quite frequently (My favorite blog posts of hers related to this model are here, here, here, and here). But, no matter how you blend your classroom, I am finding that the most powerful and game-changing choices we can make is to use short, engaging teacher-created videos.

This post will be the first in a series about introducing these videos with your classes.

 

3 Great Ideas for Screencasting Software

    Teachers sometimes bristle when there are calls to give up on the “sage on the stage” model. I know that I was a student who responded fairly well to a good lecture. I am not quite ready to admit that the whole-class lecture is dead (here’s a really interesting NY Times Op-Ed about this very topic).

    But, I do think that we can take those awesome PowerPoints/Google Slides, and using screencasting software, modernize what once took us a whole period to do in front of 25 students. Here are three great tools for doing that:

  • Quicktime: This program comes standard on Apple computers. Open it up, click File→ New Screen Recording. The program will record whatever is on your screen and the computer’s microphone will pick up your voice. If you narrate over a presentation, you can save the video file and share it on your LMS, YouTube, or both.

 

  • Screencast-O-Matic: This site is made specifically for making screencasts. There is a free version, which gives you the ability to make up to 15 minute videos, and also to upload the video to YouTube. The pay version ($18.00 p/y) provides you with more recording time and more uploading options, along with some other features.

 

  • Screencastify: This one has some similar features to Screencast-O-Matic, but it has the added benefit of being a Google Chrome extension. You have the option of a free and a pay plan (24 p/y), with more features (like editing) being available with the paid version. You can record your whole desktop, a browser tab, or your webcam. Integration with Google Drive and YouTube is seamless.

 

    These are just three possibilities, and of course there are many more. The goal should be to choose a screencasting software that works for you and your students. You may want one that allows you the ability to edit, so that you can make your videos as clean, polished, and engaging as possible.

    So now you know which screencast software you want to use. In the next post in this Video Series, I will discuss how to use screencasting to create a new lesson or “update” an existing one.

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One thought on “Teacher-created Video Series: 3 Great Ideas for Screencasting Software

  1. Pingback: Teacher-created Video Series: 3 Great Ideas for Using Teacher-Created Videos With Students | 3greatideas

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