Teacher-created Video Series: 3 Great Ideas for Using Videos With Teachers and Parents

This post is the final one in a series about using teacher-created videos in your classes. For the first post in the series, “3 Great Ideas for Screencasting Software,” click here. For the second post, “3 Great Ideas for Using Teacher-Created Videos with Students,” click here.

Using Video (and other methods) to Flip the Faculty Meeting

“The big question is, What’s the best use of face-to-face time? My argument would be it’s not talking about the hat policy or fire drill procedures.”

– Jon Bergmann

Although there may have been a time where the faculty meeting was the most effective way of delivering information to staff, we can probably all admit that we’ve sat through many meetings that could have easily been replicated in an email. Even more frustrating? Sitting in a PD session meant to encourage teachers to try a dynamic, engaging best practice…that is delivered via PowerPoint slides. But, just as we’ve seen that teachers can create videos to maximize face-to-face time with students, administrators can capitalize on those same methods to reinvigorate the (sometimes) dreaded faculty meeting.

Sarah McKibben, writing for ASCD, detailed a number of school leaders who have made the move to flipped faculty meetings. Some have created videos using many of the methods detailed in Part 1 of this series, whereas others use email, blogs, their school websites, or other methods to communicate any information that doesn’t warrant a discussion. In doing so, administrators are able to use that faculty meeting time in a more meaningful way–for professional development, small group work, or discuss an article/topic that was shared previously. In some cases, flipping the faculty meeting replaces the physical meeting in its entirety.

Now, I know that some of you may be thinking, “what do you do about people who choose to not watch the videos/read the blog/etc. in advance?” While I’d agree that those people would be unprepared for the face-to-face time that follows, I would challenge you to think about how many people are truly engaged and paying attention during the old-fashioned “laundry-list agenda” faculty meeting. In fact, the expectation that teachers will actually have to apply what they learn from a video/blog post may actually raise the stakes and lead more people in the room to engage with the material that in the past, they were able to tune out.

Using Video to Communicate With Parents

Parents in many districts know how to get in touch with their child’s teacher if they have questions. Usually, in my experience, this has been through email and the occasional phone call. I find that most of the time, parents just want to be in the loop about not only their child’s progress, but also, the teacher’s expectations and how he/she believes a class should run.

A district website with dedicated spaces for departments (at least on the middle/high school level) and teacher pages helps. But, what if, on those department pages, schools made the effort to provide videos of their supervisors and teachers discussing their teaching philosophies? Or if these videos could capture what is happening inside our classrooms? I’m not naive enough to think that these measures would obfuscate the email to a teacher, but they could certainly provide an extra point of reference.

Another idea that my #CELmate and friend Kate Baker has written about extensively is flipping your Back to School Night. I won’t rehash too much, because she does a much better job than I could explaining her process here.  I have also seen a similar post about flipping Back to School Night from Catlin Tucker, which you can read here. 

Regardless of how you choose to do it, the goal is to give parents the opportunity to experience what it is like being a student in your class. If you use these technologies frequently with their kids, then show them what that kind of learning looks like. The plus side? It can help dispel some of the myths that sometimes arise around flipped learning, such as, “the teacher is just assigning me videos and doesn’t teach.” If you communicate to parents beforehand that they should watch a Back to School Night video, then you will have the opportunity to engage in a follow-up activity in person. In a night full of whirlwind presentations and paper handouts, the visit to your classroom may be the one that stands out.

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