Teacher-created Video Series: 3 Great Ideas for Using Teacher-Created Videos With Students

This post is the second in a series about using teacher-created videos in your classes. For the first post in the series, “3 Great Ideas for Screencasting Software,” click here.

So, now you’ve chosen the software/application that works best for you. But what should you do with it? How can you use video to enhance your lessons (and not simply substitute one thing for another, or add something more to your plate)? While I think everyone is able to create their own videos, there are so many out there already. If you’re not quite ready to take the leap, a bit of Googling/YouTube searching will almost certainly result in some great stuff that other teachers were happy enough to post online.

3 Great Ideas for

Using Teacher-Created Videos With Students

 

  • Use Video to Flip Your Lectures

 

This is really easy to do once you have chosen the video software with which you’re most comfortable, and what is nice is that other than recording your voice/image, you don’t necessarily have to do a ton of new work.

Take one of your tried-and-true PowerPoint/Google Slides presentations. Then, using your preferred screencasting application, record the lecture that you would normally give in front of your whole class. From here, you have a couple of options.

I prefer to load my videos to YouTube, as it makes it easier for students to watch a teacher-created video on multiple devices. This can also help you if you’re dealing with equity issues; if a student does not have working internet at home, or a laptop computer, he/she may still have a smartphone or tablet, both of which are well-suited to viewing YouTube videos.

You can use a traditional flipped-lesson approach, assigning these teacher-created videos for homework. Then, the time you used to use in class to present material can be used instead to answer student questions and practice skills.

I also am not shy about how much I love using the station rotation model of blended learning that Catlin Tucker talks about extensively (see her blog here). A key component of a good station-rotation can often be the use of an “in-class flip.” Follow the same steps as outlined above, but instead of having students watch the video at home, they can actually watch the video at one of the rotating stations during class. This also can solve issues of equity; while many of us may not work in a 1:1 device environment, we may have access to a cart of laptops, or a classroom desktop computer. This model allows for a small group of students to watch a short video (I’d keep it to five minutes or so) on one screen. While they do this, their peers may be working in another small group with the teacher, or independently at another station.

In either scenario, if you’re worried about accountability (ie. How do I know they watched/understood my video?), EdPuzzle is a fantastic, free site that allows teachers to embed questions in any YouTube video (another benefit to adding your own videos to YouTube). You can then monitor student progress and formatively assess them on information conveyed by the video.

 

  • Use Video To Explain Rubrics

 

While I have used teacher-created videos and screencasts for a few years, this is something that I only just started doing. You may have rubrics or grading guidelines that you use often. And yet, simply handing students a rubric does not guarantee that they understand the assignment. There have been many times where I have spent a good portion of my class explaining and teaching the sections of my rubrics (perhaps this is a sign that I should simplify them? Definitely something I should look into…), and if you use this same document again and again, those minutes are going to add up over the course of a school year.

So, I’ve made a short video to explain the categories of my writing rubric. I use this same rubric for all argument essays, and students should understand how to use when completing drafts. The first time I used this rubric, I spent some time in class going over it, but I also made the video available. Now, I can direct students (and parents) to that video as a first step, freeing up more of my class time to work on the actual writing of their essays.

You can do this for nearly any procedural thing that you do often in your classes. I have made videos that explain my course and used them at the start of the year, which has allowed me to get started with the curriculum on the very first day of school. I’ve also made tutorials for using various technology tools that we use throughout the year. Anything that allows you to maximize the face-to-face time you have with your students is a plus in my book.

 

  • Have Students Create Videos to Demonstrate Their Learning

 

Using video in student projects is nothing new. I have seen countless students create “movie trailers” for books they’ve read, or produce other creative work using their parents’ video cameras, and then, their smartphones.

Something that I think we can encourage more of though, is to have students demonstrate their learning via screencasts. What if a student talked through her writing choices in an essay, while highlighting or circling specific words and phrases? Or, if a student solved an equation in math, and made a video explaining his process? With video, we can rethink how we ask students to “show what they know.”

I challenge you to ask students to produce a video in place of a traditional quiz or test (not all the time, of course). Think about using a portfolio process where students can reflect on their learning via a screencast, while they open up the various assignments they’re talking about.

You may find that students who typically struggle on traditional assessments may actually know a lot more than we think if provided with a different way of showing it.

 

These are just three of the endless possibilities for using videos with your students in a meaningful way. In the final post of this series, we’ll look at ways that schools are incorporating videos outside of the classroom and in the larger school community.

 

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